The Interviewees (so far)

We've been fortunate enough to interview many leading figures from the movie industry. From Directors to Agents, from Actors to Producers we have gathered an immense wealth of insight into the world of filmmaking and more specifically the 'Ghost in the Noonday Sun' production.


Norma Farnes

Norma Farnes

'Personal Assistant to show business personality,' read the advertisement which caught Norma Farnes's eye back in 1966. Norma was plunged into the anarchic world of Number 9 Orme Court, where Spike and other great post-war comedy writers like Eric Sykes, Johnny Speight, Galton and Simpson had formed a writer's cooperative.

At her interview, Spike said: 'You've got legs just like Olive Oyl; who would want to make love to an elastic band?' Norma responded, 'Another elastic band', Spike laughed and said, 'You'll do for me.' She planned on sticking with the job for three months, but stayed with Spike until his death 36 years later. Over this time she became his agent, manager, confidante and loyal friend. Following Spike's death in 2002 she's dedicated her life to securing his legacy, running his estate on behalf of his children. Norma is also an accomplished author.

Norma Farnes is a warm, elegantly attired lady with a quick Yorkshire wit, and a breezy, infectious laugh. Her large ground floor office in Bayswater, is a fitting testament to the life of one of our funniest, most creative entertainers. Photos and mementos of Spike and his friends pepper the walls. The room is a museum to his memory, his larger-than-life personality permeating the place to such a degree that it is hard not to sense the emptiness left in his void.

Dennis Fraser

Dennis Fraser

Dennis has had a prolific career as a Key Grip and has worked on many legendary films, from 'Where Eagles Dare' and 'Chariots of Fire' to 'The Man who would be King' and 'Pink Floyd The Wall'.

He's worked with many notable Directors and is considered in the business as one of the leading grip specialists, so much so he was made a Member (of the order) of the British Empire (MBE). Other awards include; John Alcott Award for Technical Achievement, an Honorary member of BECTU and numerous GBCT awards for Excellence. In 2006 Dennis co-founded Chapman/Leonard, the UK's premier grip equipment center.

Rene Borisewitz

Rene Borisewitz

Rene is a brilliant sound engineer from the days of Hi-Fi. Studying at Birmingham University, he soon earned a reputation for 'improving' everyone's equipment, often welding into the depths of the night.

Amplification of sound was one of his biggest interests. Interupting his studies in the 50's, he was recalled to Belgium for his National Service, during which he is credited with revolutionising Belgian Army Communications. Rene has an illustrious catalogue of both film and television credits and has worked extensively in the music business. As one colleague put it "A memorable character with a strong personality and deeply held opinions. He had a very strong voice with great enunciation. Very popular with the ladies."

Michael Stevenson

Michael Stevenson

Michael is one of the most well respected and well loved second assistant directors in the Industry. His career has spanned over 50 years working on many of the most successful films in cinema history. His credits include Lawrence of Arabia, Dr Zhivago, The Spy who loved me, Highlander, Mission Impossible, Pearl harbour, all of the Harry Potters, Clash of the Titans and The Social network to name only a few, the list goes on and on.

He remained a very close friend of Peter Sellers.

Robin Dalton

Robin Dalton

Robin is best known as a literary agent, turning a frail firm into one of the world's best, representing the famous and soon-to-be, authors and directors such as Tennesee Williams, Edna O'Brien, Arthur Miller, Iris Murdoch, Margaret Drabble and Peter Weir.

In her late 50s she gave the agency away and took up producing movies - naturally, high-profile and successful (Madame Sousatzka and Oscar and Lucinda as examples). In her 70s, she returned to writing.

Now in her 90s, she's living life and looking forward to her next adventure. 'Dead' is a 4-Letter Word is her first ebook.

Murray Melvin

Murray Melvin

Murray is an English stage and film actor noted for his work with Joan Littlewood, Ken Russell and Stanley Kubrick. He is the author of two books: The Art of Theatre Workshop and The Theatre Royal, A History of the Building.

Melvin became a member of what has often been called the Ken Russell Repertory Company, appearing in many of Russell's most celebrated films, including The Devils and The Boy Friend. Lewis Gilbert cast Melvin in H.M.S. Defiant (1962), alongside Dirk Bogarde, and in Alfie, where he played Michael Caine's work friend, stealing petrol and taking photographs to sell to tourists.

A founder member of the Actors' Centre and was its chairman for four years during which time he started a centre in Manchester in honour of Joan Littlewood and the Theatre Workshop.

As a Theatre Director, he has worked across all genre's including opera, recital, drama and comedy. He directed the first productions of three of Graeme Garden's perennially popular pantomimes.

Lord Anthony Rufus Isaacs

Anthony Rufus Isaacs

Antony's career spans more than 3 decades, producing such classics as 'Nine and a Half Weeks' and 'Cohen and Tate'. He also produced a film starring Peter Sellers and Charles Aznavour (The Blockhouse, 1972).

Prior to feature films, Antony also produced commercials in the glorious 'Mad Men' genre of the 60's and 70's. Producing also the award winning Benson & Hedges commercial shot on location in Kyrenia, Cyprus during the production of Ghost in the Noonday Sun.

David Korda

David Korda

Following in the footsteps of his father Zoltan, David entered the film business working initially as a unit manager, and then begining a long Producing career.

Turning his hand to completion bonding, Peter has worked for the last few decades in the leading completion guarantee company, Film Finances Inc. and has worked on most of film history's significant films.

Piers Haggard

Piers Haggard

Piers began his career directing plays for the anthology drama series Thirty-Minute Theatre in the 1960s, later working on the more prestigious anthology shows Armchair Theatre (for ITV) and Play for Today (for the BBC). He directed for a variety of programmes throughout the 1970s, such as The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes and Love for Lydia. His film work includes I Can't... I Can't (1969), The Blood on Satan's Claw (1970), The Fiendish Plot of Dr. Fu Manchu (1980) and Venom (1981).

In 1978 he was the director of Dennis Potter's landmark drama serial Pennies From Heaven for the BBC, and the following year he directed the expensive science-fiction serial Quatermass, a Euston Films production for Thames Television, shown on the ITV network. In 1983, Piers became one of the founder members of the Director's Guild of Great Britain, which was formed at a meeting of various film and television directors at Ronnie Scott's Club in London.

More recent work has included the Gerry Anderson science-fiction series Space Precinct (1994), the Canadian film Conquest (1998) and various one-off TV dramas such as Eskimo Day (1996) Cold Enough For Snow (1997) and The Hunt (2001). He directed Academy Award winners, Vanessa Redgrave and Maximilian Schell in the 2006 miniseries, The Shell Seekers.

Joe McGrath

Joe McGrath

Joe is a Scottish film and television director and screenwriter. Best known for Casino Royale (1967), a film on which numerous directors worked, and The Magic Christian (1969), McGrath frequently collaborated with Spike Milligan and Peter Sellers.

Casino Royale is often referenced as the ultimate disaster production, with Joe only ending up with directing scenes with Peter Sellers, Ursula Andress and Orson Welles. Sellers fell out with the Producer and insisted that he hire Joe. He then refused to appear on set with co-star Orson Welles. Many concluded that the already eccentric Sellers had gone mad, especially after he came to blows with McGrath and then fled the set - never to return.. In 2012 it was summed up as; Take one deluded producer, two huge egos, four directors, five 007s and half-adozen writers. Sprinkle with cash, add jokes to taste, shake, stir - and voila! Casino Royale: a cocktail recipe for disaster.

Joe Directed The Magic Christian in 1969 starring Peter Sellers and Ringo Starr, with noteworthy appearances by John Cleese, Raquel Welch, Christopher Lee, Richard Attenborough and Roman Polanski. The film was once described as: antiestablishmentarian, antibellum, antitrust, antiseptic, antibiotic, antisocial & antipasto.

In 1974 he Directed Peter Sellers and Spike Milligan in The Great McDonagall, a kind of music hall melodrama. Milligan stars as the eponymous bard, Julia Foster as his wife, Sellers in drag as Queen Victoria and a troupe of actors (including Valentine Dyall and Victor Spinetti) undertaking multiple roles. The film was shot entirely at the historic Wilton's Music Hall and so absorbed was Milligan by the role that he actually slept in its rat-infested environs during the production.

In one remarkable scene Milligan seemingly forgets his line and has to have it explained to him by the director before the story can resume. It's entirely deliberate and part of the script, but so convincing is Milligan that many, weren't sure what to make of it.

Simon Van Der Borgh

Simon van der Borgh

Simon has written feature film commissions for producers such as Warp Films, Film and General, Met Films and Jimmy de Brabant. He has also written spec scripts which he's sold in London, New York and Los Angeles, and two full-length theatre plays: 'I'm him he's nobody' (2012) and 'Mad Dogs' (2010). His draft of 'In Transit' (dir. Tom Roberts) attracted John Malkovich and Vera Farmiga onto the movie, which was released in 2008.

Simon is also known internationally as a screenwriting teacher and script consultant. Films he's worked on include Noel Clarke's 'Kidulthood' (dir. Menhaj Huda), Justin Kerrigan's 'I know you know', and 'Drift' starring Sam Worthington.

Simon's 'Mad Dogs' script is the story of the making of Ghost in the Noonday Sun and was born out of hours of conversation with Peter Medak.

Joe Dunne

Joe Dunne

Joe has reigned supreme in the stunt world for some 50 years, worked as a stuntperson, stunt coordinator, stunt double, stunt driver, second unit director and an actor.

His more recent work on The Usual Suspects (1995), Ronin (1998) and The Jackal (1997) has cemented his legacy in the stunt men Hall of Fame.

Whether he was flying through the air in single combat against 'Kato' in the Pink Panthers or walking the gang plank in Ghost in the Noonday Sun, Joe was always by the side of his friend, Peter Sellers.

Sandy Lieberson

Sandy Lieberson

Born in Los Angeles, California, Sandy Lieberson began as an agent with clients including Sergio Leone, Peter Sellers, Richard Harris and The Rolling Stones before becoming a film producer. He also was head of production for UK 20th Century Fox and MGM and Film London.

In 1968 he founded the British production company Goodtimes Enterprises, which produced films such as Performance (1970), Mahler (1974) and Lisztomania (1975). David Puttnam became a partner of Goodtimes in 1970.

Since the mid-1970s, Lieberson formed a new production company called Umbrella Entertainment, which produced films such as Jabberwocky (1977) and Rita, Sue and Bob Too (1987). Between 1977 and 1980, he held various positions at 20th Century Fox, and was subsequently Vice President of International Production for The Ladd Company, before becoming Chief of Production at Goldcrest Films between 1984 and 1986. He was also head of production for UK 20th Century Fox and MGM, and was the inaugural Chair of Film London from 2003, continuing to help shape it for eight years. He set up the Producers course at the National Film and Television School and was Head Tutor of its Producing Department.

Tony Christodoulou

Tony Christodoulou

A publicist in London in the pop world of the 60's, he moved to Cyprus in the late 60's and founded a PR firm.

He was approached by Columbia to act as the 'local' fixer for Ghost in the Noonday Sun, responsible for the day to day local needs of the production and became a great friend to the actors and crew.

Costas Evagorou

Costas Evagorou

One of two young 'Costa Brothers' that Ghost's cast and crew remember with much fondness. Costa ran the 'Kyrenia Watersports' company that operated out of the harbour, suppling the support boats for the production. One of his main tasks was to ferry out to the pirate boat, the likes of Sellers, Milligan and Franciosa and was often privy to the internal wrangling on the film.

Dr. Tony Greenberg

Dr. Tony Greenberg

Often referred to as the Doctor to the celebrity world, Tony was the doctor of choice in the 60's and 70's in swinging London. He first came to notoriety for his revolutionary approach to dieting that saw a veritable who's who of actresses, fashion models and royalty visiting his surgery.

Lorenzo Berni

Lorenzo Berni

San Lorenzo, run by Lorenzo & Mara has been the favourite haunt of famous figures since its opening in the early 60's.

When Sophia Loren visited the Osteria when filming The Countess from Hong Kong, the resulting newspaper diary items cemented San Lorenzo's reputation. "It was just a few weeks after we opened," Mara recalled, "Loren, just one woman at the long table with 12 men."

Shortly afterwards Peter Sellers and his then wife Britt Ekland brought Princess Margaret and Lord Snowdon.

There was, however, more to San Lorenzo than celebrities and newly fashionable food. Mara Berni also did everything she could to make their new customers feel like regulars, and their regulars like members of their family. And she soon became accustomed to the idiosyncrasies of their habitués: "Antonioni [the film director], very complicated films and just little complicated food, little bit of this, some of that, all chopped up small, carrots, beans; Federico Fellini, his films were big and luscious and strong – he always ordered pasta and then a T-bone steak."

From the start, San Lorenzo offered then unusual dishes such as pigeon with polenta, or sea bass. Northern recipes very much influenced their menu from the earliest days. Mara offered the regional specialities of her home in Piedmont, including agnolotti, bagna cauda, bollito misto and risotto.

The restaurant has never taken credit cards, and this was not because of the commission charges. "The man from Diners Club came around at the beginning, to arrange for us to take their card," Mara said. "But he took one look at the restaurant and said, 'I'm sorry, you're too small." After that, Mara remained defiant: "They have all been in here to try and persuade us to take credit cards, but we did fine without them and I don't see why we should allow them to treat us like that. Everybody starts out small."

Mara passed away in 2012 but Lorenzo, still working in his late eighties presides over San Lorenzo today.

Clive Revill

Clive Revill

A grand, well-respected actor of stage, film and television, most people think New Zealander Clive Revill is British. Although most people think of the curly, red-haired gent as a comic eccentric best known for his sterling work on the musical stage, he has been highly regarded for his formidable dramatic work in Shakespearean roles. Clive played the part of 'Bay of Algiers' in Ghost in the Noonday Sun.

A man of many skills, Clive Selsby Revill was born on April 18, 1930, in Wellington, New Zealand, and educated at Rongotai College and Victoria University (Wellington). Once trained for a career as an accountant, he abruptly switched gears and made his stage debut in Auckland, New Zealand playing Sebastian in Twelfth Night in 1950. He then moved to England to study with the Old Vic School in London. While there he appeared at Stratford-on-Avon in mid-1950s presentations of Hamlet, Love's Labour's Lost, The Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar and The Tempest, among others.

Having made his Broadway debut back in 1952 with Mr. Pickwick, he took a juicy chunk out of the Big Apple upon returning to New York in the 1960s with his critically lauded, Tony Award-nominated work in Irma La Douce and as Fagin in Oliver! He has delighted audiences for years with his larger-than-life musical roles, particularly in the Gilbert and Sullivan operettas The Mikado and The Pirates of Penzance. Other have included Sherry, Lolita and The Mystery of Edwin Drood -- replacing the late George Rose in the last mentioned after the actor's untimely death in 1988.

Most adept at ethnic roles (he has played everything from Chinese to Russian), he has become legendary for his acute sense of comic timing and uncanny use of body language. Revill has reveled over the years playing delightfully pompous, hissable gents to the hilt. Making an inauspicious debut in an unbilled role in 1956, his more pronounced movie work includes Kaleidoscope (1966), The Assassination Bureau (1969), The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1970), Avanti! (1972), for which he received a Golden Globe nomination, The Legend of Hell House (1973), Mack the Knife (1989) and Robin Hood: Men in Tights (1993).

Danton Rissner

Danton Rissner

Dan has had an illustrious career in the movie business, holding executive positions at Warner Bros., United Artists and 20th Century Fox.

After a stint in the Army, he joined United Cerebral Palsy Associates and produced over 25 telethons. In 1966 Mr. Dan went to work for the Ashley Famous Agency and within a span of two years became Head of the Motion Picture Literary Department.

When the Ashley Famous Agency was sold, he moved to Warner Bros., as VP in Charge of European Production (at age 29). He was based in London and under his leadership A Clockwork Orange, The Devils, Death in Venice and the Drama of Jealousy directed by Scola with Mastroianni and Gianini were produced.

Dan left Warner Bros. in 1971 to join United Artist Corp. as Executive Vice President in Charge of European Production. He was based in England from 1971-1978 and was responsible for overseeing and initiating films such as: The Music Lovers, Scorpio, Man With The Golden Gun, Valentino, The Confession, The Night Porter, Rollerball, Yanks, and oversaw physical production of Last Tango In Paris (initiated by David Picker).

Dan returned to the U.S. in 1978 and continued to run the United Artist European operation from New York. He initiated and supervised: Semi-Tough, Equus, Missouri Breaks, Hair, The Spy Who Loved Me, Moonraker, Who'll Stop The Rain, Fellini's Roma, La Cage Aux Folles 1, Farewell My Lovely, Dead Cert and was instrumental in re teaming Blake Edwards and Peter Sellers to start a new series of films starring Inspector Closeau which resulted in The Return of the Pink Panther and Revenge of the Pink Panther.

After a brief stay as head of world-wide production for United Artists (cut short by medical difficulties) For Your Eyes Only, Rocky3, Woody Allens A midnights Sex Comedy and Gordon Willi's Window's were made.

In 1982 Dan joined 20th Century Fox as Executive VP for Production , and intiated and supervised Ladyhawke, Unfaithfully Yours, and Star Chamber. From 1982-1985 he returned to UA as Executive VP and was responsible for Michael Cimino's Year of the Dragon, 2010 A Space Oddysey and the James Bond Film Octopussy.

John Goldstone

John Goldstone

John has been producing comedy films since the mid 70s involving a long term relationship with Monty Python.

John is credited with the following productions for the Pythons: Monty Phython & the Holy Grail, Life of Brian, The Meaning of Life, Jabberwocky, Erik the Viking.

His career in film began in 1961 as production assistant on A Kind of Loving (John Schlesinger) then seven years as PA to its producer Joseph Janni on his seminal British films Billy Liar, Darling, Far From the Maddening Crowd, Modesty Blaise (Joseph Losey) and Poor Cow (Ken Loach).

His first film as a producer was Three Sisters directed by Laurence Olivier. His collaboration with the Monty Python team began in 1974 with Monty Python & The Holy Grail then Life of Brian and The Meaning of Life. He also produced such diverse films as The Final Programme; The Rocky Horror Picture Show and its sequel Shock Treatment; Paul Morrissey's The Hound of the Baskervilles with Peter Cook and Dudley Moore; and six feature length Harlequin Romances for US tv and video release.

In 1990 he created The Comedy House with funding from Twentieth Century-Fox to promote British film comedy talent. In 1992 the 30th Carry On film Carry on Columbus, directed by Gerald Thomas with several generations of British comedy talent. In 1996 the live action version of The Wind in the Willows written, directed by and starring Terry Jones with Eric Idle, Steve Coogan, Nicol Williamson, Antony Sher, John Cleese and Michael Palin for Walt Disney and Columbia release. In 1998 Henry Jaglom's Deja Vu starring Victoria Foyt, Stephen Dillane and Vanessa Redgrave. In 1999 the BFI London IMAX Cinema Signature Film written and directed by Terry Jones and starring John Cleese. In 1999 Henry Jaglom's new film Festival shot against the 1999 Cannes Film Festival starring Anouk Aimee, Greta Scacchi, Maximilian Schell and Ron Silver.

John Heyman

John Heyman (1933–2017)

Very sadly Mr Heyman passed away during the making of this film. John was a legendary film and TV producer whose catalogue extends to over 150 films.

In 1955 Heyman at the age of 22 was Head of Public Relations at Associated Television, one of the two founder companies of the ITV. By then he was working on five of the network's television programs, three of which were rated among ITV's top ten.

In 1959 Heyman formed The International Artists Agency, which represented, among others, Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, Richard Harris, Trevor Howard, Shirley Bassey, and Burt Bacharach.

In 1961 the agency formed the subsidiary World Film Sales, the first company to pre-sell and license pictures on a territory-by-territory basis. It was the first of a series of companies which would become the World Group of Companies Limited. For over 40 years, the company have been producers, packagers, co-financiers, investors, or distributors of films that have garnered more than 150 Academy Award nominations and more than two dozen Oscars.

In 1963 Heyman started to work as a film producer with The Go- Between and The Hireling, which both won the Grand Prix at Cannes. In 1964 he also co-produced the longest running Hamlet in Broadway history, starring Richard Burton and directed by John Gielgud.

In 1973 he founded The Genesis Project to create an audio-visual encyclopaedia which became the most viewed film in history.

In the early 70's, Heyman began to render financial services to major film studios, and is widely credited with creating "structured financing" in the film industry. As a result of his efforts, some $4 billion has been provided to co-finance more than 150 films.

In 1990 Heyman co-founded Island World, which produced and licensed film and television programs and was the only company to have had programs airing on all five UK terrestrial channels in the same year. The company received a special award from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts "acknowledging a new generation of writers, actors and producers and in bringing new blood and new talent into the industry." The company was sold in 2012.

Maggie Abbott

Maggie Abbott

Maggie's carreer as an agent has seen her represent some of the world's top talent.

Maggie Abbott started writing novels when she moved to Palm Springs after a long, successful show business career in Los Angeles, London, Rome, and New York.

A casual job as a secretary at the William Morris Agency in Rome introduced her to the exciting scene of Cleopatra, Fellini's 8. and The Pink Panther, with the city's influx of big stars calling by the office every day, and triggered her lifelong love affair with movies.

Over the years, Maggie has enjoyed being in the most interesting places at the best of their times, while working as the movie agent for some exciting stars: Mick Jagger, David Bowie, Charlotte Rampling, Jacqueline Bisset, Martin Sheen, Raquel Welch, Christopher Plummer, Robert Redford, Mia Farrow, Peter Sellers, Richard Chamberlain, Peter O'Toole, Britt Ekland, Ken Russell, John Boorman, and many more.

Somewhere in between, Maggie was the production assistant on three Broadway plays, and a producer and studio executive at Columbia Pictures where she developed and got production credits on two movies.

Rita Franciosa

Rita Franciosa

Originally a model, Rita moved into acting in the late 60's. Notable roles are Funny Girl (1968) and The Silencers (1966).

Rita married Tony Franciosa in 1970, lasting 35 years until Tony's death in January 2006.

Robert Wagner

Robert Wagner

Is one of the most popular and successful stars in the entertainment industry, boasting three hit series and an impressive list of both feature and television films.

As a young man under contract to 20th Century Fox, Wagner was cast by Darryl F. Zanuck in With a Song in My Heart. Although the part lasted a scant minute, his performance as a crippled soldier responding to the song of Susan Hayward brought immediate public reaction to the studio. Spencer Tracy saw him in Beneath the Twelve Mile Reef and requested Wagner for the role of his son in Broken Lance. Tracy was so impressed with Wagner, he cast him as his brother again in The Mountain. A small sample of his numerous film credits includes Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story, The Pink Panther, The Curse of the Pink Panther, Midway, The Towering Inferno, Banning, Harper, Prince Valiant, The True Story of Jesse James, and All the Fine Young Cannibals. He recently re-created his role of "Number Two",The villainous henchman to Dr. Evil, the archenemy of Mike Myers' title character in Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me. Antonio Banderas also directed Wagner in Crazy in Alabama. In 1998, the actor was in Wild Things, starring Matt Dillon and Kevin Bacon.

On television, Wagner has starred on three long-running series, It Takes a Thief, with Fred Astaire, Switch, with Eddie Albert and Sharon Gless and Hart to Hart, with Stefanie Powers. He was nominated for an Emmy for his role as Alexander Mundy in It Takes a Thief. Since the end of the regular run of the series, the actor has produced eight Hart to Hart movies for both NBC and cable's Family Channel. He also starred with Jaclyn Smith in the top-rated miniseries Windmills of the Gods, based on Sidney Sheldon's best-selling novel; with Angie Dickinson in the miniseries Pearl; with Audrey Hepburn in Love among Thieves; with Lesley Anne Down in Indiscreet and in North and South III, with Joanne Woodward in A Kiss Before Dying; and with Elizabeth Taylor in There Must Be a Pony, which he also executive-produced. Wagner was chosen by Sir Laurence Olivier to star with him in the television adaptation of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, in which he costarred with his wife, the late Natalie Wood. Wagner also teamed up with Sir Laurence Oliver in This Gun for Hire, Danielle Steel's Jewels and To Catch a King.

In addition to all his film and television ventures, Wagner has toured the world performing A.R. Gurney's Love Letters, with Stefanie Powers, who were the first to launch the tour Internationally. Currently, Wagner performs Love Letters at charity events with his wife, actress Jill St. John.

Ruth Myers

Ruth Myers

Two-time Academy Award Nominee Ruth Myers trained at St. Martin's School of Art in London, following a stint at the Royal Court Theatre she contributed to at least 15 productions which included John Osborne's Hotel in Amsterdam and Time Present, and David Hare's Stag.

Ruth started to design for the theatre and then for low-budget English films beginning in 1967 with Smashing Time, A Touch of Class, Peter Medak's The Ruling Class, and The Twelve Chairs.

After being persuaded to come to America by Gene Wilder, she collaborated with him on The World's Greatest Lover, The Woman in Red and Haunted Honeymoon. She also then designed for Joseph Losey's Galileo and The Romantic Englishwoman. It was on this film that she met her late husband, noted Production Designer, Richard MacDonald. As a couple they enjoyed a dynamic collaboration on films that include Sydney Pollack's The Firm; Fred Schepsi's Plenty and The Russia House; Norman Jewison's And Justice For All; Ken Russell's Altered States; Jack Clayton's Something Wicked This Way Comes; and Barry Sonnenfeld's The Addams Family, for which Ms. Myers
received an Academy Award nomination.

Since 1993, she has designed more than 30 films including Curtis Hanson's L.A. Confidential; Douglas McGrath's Emma, (for which she earned her second Academy Award nomination) Nicholas Nickelby and Infamous; Taylor Hackford's Proof of Life,; Mimi Leder's Deep Impact; John Curran's The Painted Veil. Her most recent films are the forthcoming City of Ember, directed by Gil Kenan; and The Golden Compass, directed by Chris Weitz.
In 2003 Ruth designed the costumes for the pilot episode of HBO's Carnivale, creating the look for the continuing series and garnering an Emmy.

Victoria Sellers

Victoria Sellers

No bio available.

Costa Demetriou

Costa Demetriou

No bio available.

Susan Wood

Susan Wood

From 1973 Susan was Peter Sellers' secretary.

Along with Burt Mortimer (Sellers' confidant and chauffeur), Sue was one of the closest people to Sellers. She remained by his side until his untimely death in 1980. A loyal and caring force in Sellers' life, she witnessed first hand, the highs and lows in what can only be described as a rollercoaster of a ride. "There was never a dull moment", she recalls, "He truly was one of a kind".

Ghost in the Noonday Sun was Sue's first experience on a movie. "It was a true baptism of fire and I think that's why those memories are still so vivid".

It was so important for our film to interview someone close to Sellers. Sue brings an emotional and insightful perspective to the world of Peter Sellers.

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